Survey finds a third of Panamanians who claim to have spotted alien craft report 'strange sexual desire' straight after


It’s no wonder they’re known as ‘close encounters’ – according to a survey in Panama, people who claim they’ve seen a UFO are often struck by feelings of sexual desire immediately afterward.

Of the 1,200 respondents who participated in the survey, far more people reported an increased sexual appetite after a UFO sighting than feelings of terror.

Despite the sudden friskiness, though, most said they would not want to meet an alien, which may come as little surprise considering many reportedly believed these visitors take the form of giant lizards or ‘unimaginable’ beings.

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It’s no wonder they’re known as ‘close encounters’ – according to a survey in Panama, people who claim they’ve seen a UFO are often struck by feelings of sexual desire immediately afterward. A stock image is pictured 

WHY WE SEE FACES ON MARS

Pareidolia is the psychological response to seeing faces and other significant and everyday items in random stimulus.

It is a form of apophenia, when people see patterns in random, unconnected data.

There have been multiple occasions when people have claimed to see religious images and themes in unexpected places.

On the red planet, one of the most famous is the ‘face on Mars’ spotted by one of the Viking orbiters in 1976.

This was later proven to just be a chance alignment of shifting sand dunes.

The survey was conducted between June 7th and June 20th in Panama by marketing firm Cid Gallup, and appeared in El Siglo newspaper, but has recently experienced a resurgence in popularity after being picked up by ET Updates.

Six percent of Panamanians claimed they’ve seen a UFO, according to the survey, and of this group, 37 percent said it had awakened their sex drive.

‘A desire for sex was the strongest feeling – according to the survey – among those who claim having seen a UFO, far above a feeling of terror (17%),’ said Diana Santanach, director of Cid Gallup.

‘There is no specific explanation offered by the survey as to this reason. 

‘Thirty-eight per cent responded having felt nothing in particular.’

Along with this, the survey also found that 39 percent of people saw UFOs as saucers, while others saw them as hornets (4%), top shaped (3%), and cranes (1%).

The vast majority (61%) said they would prefer not to meet an alien, while 12 percent of the respondents said they would like to have such an opportunity.

A quarter of the participants didn’t know, or didn’t answer.

They participants also gave some insight as to what people believe aliens might look like.

While 11 percent of the group thought they would look like humans, 12 percent said they would resemble giant lizards, and 2 percent said they’d look like angels.

Six percent of Panamanians claimed they’ve seen a UFO, according to the survey, and of this group, 37 percent said it had awakened their sex drive. A stock image is pictured 

But, most (72%) thought they would be ‘unimaginable.’

Interestingly, just 37 percent of the participants reported that they believe in life on other planets, while 63 percent refused to believe this. 

While the claims may seem bizarre, ‘UFO’ sightings remain extremely common among alien enthusiasts of the internet.  

Most recently, a fast-moving object spotted flying by the International Space Station moments before its livestream went dead had conspiracy theorists claiming NASA is covering up proof of a UFO.

In the footage from the ISS channel uploaded to YouTube by user ColdPyro, a white speck can be seen emerging from the darkness just above Earth’s horizon.

Right before the ‘UFO’ travels out of view, the feed cuts to a grey screen, followed by a statement asking users to ‘please stand by’ due to technical issues. 

It isn’t always possible to determine exactly what these objects are during the brief period they appear in the stream, but there are a number possible explanations for these types of sightings.

In the past, a Nasa spokesperson has explained, ‘Reflections from station windows, the spacecraft structure itself or lights from Earth commonly appear as artefacts in photos and videos from the orbiting laboratory.’ 

BELIEVE IN CONSPIRACY THEORIES? YOU’RE PROBABLY A NARCISSIST

People who doubt the moon landings are more likely to be selfish and attention-seeking, according to a study earlier this year.

Over the course of three online-based studies, researchers at the University of Kent showed strong links between the belief in conspiracy theories and negative psychological traits.

Writing in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science, the team explained: ‘Previous research linked the endorsement of conspiracy theories to low self-esteem.’

In the first study, a total of 202 participants completed questionnaires on conspiracy beliefs, asking how strongly they agreed with specific statements, such as whether governments carried out acts of terrorism on their own soil.

Alongside this, they were asked to complete a narcissist scale and a self-esteem assessment.

The results showed that those people who rated highly on the narcissism scale and who had low self-esteem were more likely to be conspiracy believers.

 

 

 



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